Department of Politics - Princeton University Princeton University

Executive Committee

The main directive of the Bobst Center executive committee is to advise and support the Director and the Center’s mission.

MARK BEISSINGER, Henry W. Putnam Professor of Politics. Director, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS).

Mark R. Beissinger’s main fields of interest are social movements, revolutions, nationalism, state-building, and imperialism, with special reference to the Soviet Union and the post-Soviet states. His work has received multiple awards, including the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award presented by the American Political Science Association for the best book published in the United States in the field of government, politics, or international affairs, and the Mattei Dogan Award presented by the Society for Comparative Research for the best book published in the field of comparative research.

CARLES BOIX, Robert Garrett Professor in Politics. Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School.

Carles Boix writes and teaches on comparative political economy and comparative politics. He has received the William Riker award for the best book on political economy twice, the Mattei Dogan award for best book published in the field of comparative research and the Heinz Eulau award for best article published in the American Political Science Review.

NOLAN MCCARTY, Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs. Chair, Department of Politics.

Nolan McCarty’s research interests include U.S. politics, democratic political institutions, and political game theory. He is the recipient of the Robert Eckles Swain National Fellowship from the Hoover Institution and the John M. Olin Fellowship in Political Economy.

HELEN MILNER B.C. Forbes Professor of Public Affairs. Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School. Director, Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance.

Helen V. Milner was the chair of the Department of Politics from 2005 to 2011. She was president of the International Political Science Association (IPSA) from 2012-14. She has written extensively on issues related to international and comparative political economy, the connections between domestic politics and foreign policy, globalization and regionalism, and the relationship between democracy and trade policy.

GRIGORE POP-ELECHES, Associate Professor of Politics and Public and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School.

Grigore Pop-Eleches’ main research interests lie at the intersection between political economy and comparative political behavior, with a particular interest in Eastern Europe and Latin America. He has worked on the politics of IMF programs in Eastern Europe and Latin America, the rise of unorthodox parties in East Europe, and on the role of historical legacies in post-communist regime change.

RAFAELA DANCYGIER, Associate professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Princeton University.

Rafaela Dancygier is Associate Professor of Politics and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She received her Ph.D. in political science (with distinction) from Yale University in 2007. Dancygier specializes in comparative politics, with a focus on the implications of ethnic diversity in advanced democracies. Her work has examined the domestic consequences of international immigration, the political incorporation and electoral representation of immigrant-origin minorities, and the determinants of ethnic conflict. One of her books, Immigration and Conflict, was awarded the Best Book Award by the European Politics and Society Section of the American Political Science Association (APSA), and it was also named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title. Her articles on related topics have been awarded Best Paper Prizes by APSA’s Sections on Comparative Politics; Migration and Citizenship;  European Politics and Society; and Representation and Electoral Systems.

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